%Complete, %Work Complete, and Project without Resources with MS PROJECT 2016!

Hi,

I’ve got a question from one of my Blog Readers:

“Please clarify the following: I have created a Sample project in MS Project 2013, with tasks and assigned duration  with required predecessors.
I have base lined the plan and started tracking the progress.
I see both the % Complete field & % Work Complete as 100% for all the completed tasks.
My question is why the % Work complete is being shown as 100% even though the work /baseline work being zero and the actual work also being zero.
The % Work Complete is calculated using the formula (Actual work/Work) *100 . Is this a bug?”

This is a basic thing in any version of MS PROJECT. I will show you a simple example an I will explain why this is not a bug at all. I’ll use MS PROJECT 2016!

I will follow steps, as my Blog Reader did. So, first I will crate very simple Project, and I will put predecessors:

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Now, I’m gong to save the Baseline:

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and:

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I will show now Gantt Chart View with some additional columns:

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Now I will mark all Tasks as 100% completed:

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and I’ll get:

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Now, I’m going to explain what happened:

  1. When Task is marked as 100% completed, than %Work completed is also 100%. Why? Because Task cannot be completed if work is not completely done. It is logical. Can you imagine that Task is 100% completed (%Completed field), but you have to work on it, for example, 4 additional hours? It simply doesn’t make any sense
  2. Work, Actual Work, and baseline work is 0 (ZERO)? Why? Because work will be more than 0 if you:
    1. Assign Resources to  Tasks
    2. Manually enter work in a work field without assigning any Resource to Tasks
  3. Anyway in both cases (with work greater than zero, or with work equal zero), %Work Completed is 100% when %Completed is also 100%!

Hope this helps.

Regards!

Posted in Microsoft Project 2013, MS PROJECT 2010, MS PROJECT 2016, PMI, PRoject Management | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

New Tasks and saved Baseline in MS PRIOJECT 2016

 

Hi,

I have a reader who is novice in MS PROJECT 2016, and he has a problem;

“Hi,

I hope you are in good health.

I have some quires about cost tracking in MS Project. I had previously saved a baseline and updated the progress for tasks in it…. then I had to make some changes and added another task. Now I had to save a new baseline for it. but this time cost table show actual cost of completed tasks for new baseline cost.How can we explain this? It is going to affect the planned cost for sure! is this the right method for cost control.?

I shall be waiting for your response. “

OK! I will show you that with simple Example in MS PROJECT 2016!

First, I’m going to create brand new Project:

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and three Resources.

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Finally, I’m going to assign Resources to Tasks:

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Now I’m going to save the Baseline:

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and:

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Now I will show you Gantt Chart with some additional Columns:

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OK! Let’s say that Task1 took 2 days instead of 1 day, and it is finished:

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I will get:

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As you can see, Cost, and Actual cost is larger that Baseline cost, because Duration is extended for 1 day.

Now let’s say, that we need additional Task for my Project:

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As you can see, this Task is not in a Baseline. If I now save the Baseline again I will get:

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I will get:

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and then:

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As you can see, now the Baseline Cost is the same and Actual Cost for Task 1, and it is $1600, which is not what I wanted.

So, to avoid that I will save the Baseline (of, course I have to make undo for previous saving before!), like this:

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  and I will get:

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And that is exact what I wanted. So, when you have some Actuals, and you want to save some changes, especially for new Tasks, in the Baseline, use firs Select those new Tasks, and then choose, Select tasks option.

Regards!

Posted in Microsoft Project 2013, Micsrosoft Project 2016, MS PROJECT 2016, PMI, PRoject Management | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Resource capacity in Hours with MS PROJECT 2016 – is it possible?

Hi,

my Blog Reader has a question:

“I have a project plan with certain milestones which are to be completed on specific dates and I have resources assigned. But as per plan, the resource allocation hours are reduced whereas in my estimation they are way higher. Is there a way where I can fix hours to the resources and then they get allocated accordingly for the tasks I assign those resources to. Let me know if there’s any other turnaround for the same”

Where is problem here? If you have, for example, John as Resource in your Project, can you have his capacity in hours? And, on the other hand, how to put exact number of hours per Task which are needed to fulfill the Task?

Let me answer to the first question. Simply – NO! You can not have capacity in MS  PROJECT 2016 (or other versions) in hours. You can have them only in Units%.

Let me create very Simple Project:

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Now, let me create two resources for this Project:

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As you can see John has 100% Max units. That mean that if he assigned 100% for Task he is able to work, for example, 8 hours per day (according to working calendar). On the other hand, Mary has only 50% Max units for this Project, so she can work only half of his working hours (again, according to her Calendar). If I assign John to the Task with more than 100%, and Mary with more than 50%, then they will became over allocated. Of course if I assign John with 100% to the Task, and again to another Task with, for example, 20%, and those Tasks are supposed to be executed on the same time, he will also became over allocated.

But there is no field in which I can put capacity in hours. That lead me to another question: “How to put exact number of hours per Task which are needed to fulfill the Task?

Here I have an easy answer. If you know exact number of hours for the Task must be spent by John and Mary to complete it, simple make this Tasks as Fixed work type, and assign number of hours to John and Mary. Let’s say that John need 40 hours to complete Task 1, and Mary 32.

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and then:

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and I will get (I will use Task usage View):

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As you can see, Duration is now 8 days, because Mary has to work 32 hours, and she will work only 4 hours per day (because 50% of her Units), so the Task will have 4 hours per day * 8 days = 32 hours

To conclude, if you know exact number of hours that Resources must spend to complete the Task, always use FIXED WORK, and assign those hours for each resources.

Regards!

Posted in MICROSOFT PROJECT, Microsoft PRoject 2010, Microsoft Project 2013, MS PROJECT 2016, PMI, PRoject Management | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Actual Duration, Actual work and Fixed work Tasks in MS PROJECT 2016

Hi,

here is one problem that my Blog Reader has (I will go step by step, and I will use MS PROJECT 2016)

“When multiple resources are assigned to the task, for a given Total Work we can  calculates the   Duration either as Work divided by  Total Assignment Units   OR  by calculating the Duration for each individual resource  as Duration (Ri) = Work (Ri) / Units (Ri))  and then selecting the longest duration of the driver resource to be a task Duration. For example, let’s say we have a 3d, 36 hr task for 2 resources R1(100%)  and R2(50%)”

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As you can see task is Fixed work type, and I put 3 days in the Duration.

Now I am going to create two Resources, one with 100% units, and other with 50%:

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and I’m going to assign both Resource to Task:

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What is wrong with this Scenario. Technically nothing, but logically, if you have Fixed Work Task, it means that work is fixed, and that you know how much work you need for the Task. An, in this scenario, you should not put Duration, but Work. But, let’’ me continue with scenario from my Blog reader, and I’m going to show you Task Usage View:

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As you can see R1 should work 3 days and 8 hours per day which is 100%, and it equals 24 hours. On the other hand, R2 should work 3 days and 4 hours per day which is 50%, and it equals 12 hours.

My Blog reader continues with: “Now I enter Actual Work of 10h into resource R1  and we get:”

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The question from my Blog reader is:

“So we can’t anymore use the same approach to calculate Actual Duration using the Actual Work and Units of individual assigned resources. That is, if we calculate the Actual  Duration using the only Actual Work R1 we will get:
Actual Duration = Actual Work (R1) / Units (R1) = 10h / 100% = 1.25d which is not what shown on the screenshot above (0.83d).
So the only way to get Actual Duration right is to calculate it as:
Actual Duration =  Sum of Actual Work of each resource /  Total Units =( 10h + 0h) / (100% + 50%) = 10h/150% = 0.83d

So why is  the method of calculating the task  Duration based on the individual resource Work and Units  with subsequent selection of the longest duration doesn’t work for an Actual Duration calculations?“

Well, Microsoft Project does not calculate Actual Duration in that way. Let’s take a look on the right side of the Task Usage View:

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As you can see:

  • At Monday Work was 12 hours, and Actual Work is 8 hours (Because R1 works only 8 hours per day). Actual Duration is: Actual work / Work = 8 /12 = 0,66666
  • At Tuesday Work was 12 hours, and Actual Work is 2 hours (Because R1 works remaining 2 hours of 10 hours assigned as Actual work). Actual Duration is: Actual work / Work = 2 /12 = 0,16666
  • So Actual Duration is 0,6666 + 0,16666 = 0,83 Days!

So that is Actual Duration for the Task. And it is always calculated with work and Actual work of all Resources, not one by one!

Regards!

Posted in MICROSOFT PROJECT, Microsoft Project 2013, MS PROJECT 2010, MS PROJECT 2016, PMI, PRoject Management | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Effect of initial resource assignment on calculation of Individual resource’s work in MS PROJECT 2016

Hi,

I’ve got very good question form one of my Blog readers:

“The effect  of initial resource assignment on  calculation  of  Individual resource’s work. Suppose we want have two resources R1 (100%) and R2(50%) to work on a 20h fixed unit task.  When we enter 40h of Work first,  BEFORE simultaneously assigning the resources. After we assign, for example, two resources (one with 100%, an another with 50%), total work for the Task has been changed.

Why does Project disregard each resource’s assignment units and assigns  total work of 40h to each resource so that the total work increases twofold?

So what is the best way to initially assign several resources to a Fixed Unit task for a given Work : that is, if I want 2 resources R1 and R2 to be assigned together to as task of 40h? Only make the task fixed work type?”

OK! I will follow the question step by step!

First I’m going to create brand new Project with one Task, and I am going to put 40 hours in the Work field

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Now I’m going to create two Resources, and I will say that R1 has 100% Max Units, and R2 has 50% Max Units:

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Now, I will assign them to the Task:

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As you can see, work is now 80 hrs. Let’s see Task Usage View:

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Q: Why does Project disregard each resource’s assignment units and assigns  total work of 40h to each resource so that the total work increases twofold?
A: Because, in MS PROJECT, if you put Work for Task, for example 40 hours, it means that every Resource should spend 40 hours for completing that Task. That’s how it works!

Q: So what is the best way to initially assign several resources to a Fixed Unit task for a given Work : that is, if I want 2 resources R1 and R2 to be assigned together to as task of 40h? Only make the task fixed work type?”
A: You should do it manually. See the example below:

Let’s say that you want for your Task that Each Resource should work 20 hours for that Task.

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Here I will put 20 hours for each Resource,. and II ‘will click on OK button:

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In Fixed Units Task Type, if you want to assign different work for the Task, you must specify exact work for each resource. Otherwise, if you put work amount for the Task, and then assign Resources, each Resource will have same amount of work!

Hope this helps,

Regards!

Posted in Microsoft Project 2013, MS PROJECT 2010, MS PROJECT 2016, PMI, PRoject Management | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

A question for my Blog readers!

Hi,

I got a suggestion, and I want to hear what do you think about it: “Have you considered doing videos instead of screenshots, it would be easier for us to understand and I guess you would save time.”

I can do that as well, but I want to know what do you prefer?

Thanks for your answer!!! Smile

Posted in MS PROJECT 2016 | Tagged | 13 Comments

Relation between Overtime and Duration in MS PROJECT 2016

Hi,

I have a question from oen of my Blog readers:

“Every time I allocate the whole work hours to overtime hours the Duration column turns into 0 and the start and finish dates and time are the same. Why?”

OK! I have to explain how MS PROJECT 2016

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and I will create John, as Resource, and I will assign him to the Task:

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and:

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Now I will switch to the Task Usage View, and I will show Task Form, as well.

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As you can see, John is supposed to work 40 hours, 8 hours per day, during 5 days of Duration. Now, suppose, that John will work more than 8 hours per day, and you want to put those hours as Overtime work. Suppose that 20 hours will be overtime work:

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After I click on OK button I will get:

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As you can see, Duration is 2,5 days now. Why? MS Project calculates Duration according to next formula:

DURATION = (Work – Overtime Work) / Hours per day. In this case it is: DUARTION = (40-20)/8 = 20/ 8 = 2,5 days.

Now suppose that all 40 hours are overtime work:

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As you can see, Duration is 0 days, according to formula Duration = (40-40) / 8 = 0 Days. This make no sense but you should consider that Overtime work is something like “off the Calendar). If you consider this option you should ask yourself: “Do I understand overtime work?” Overtime work has to be smaller than total work (Work field). Overtime work is something like: “How many hours of regular work, will be over it?”. If overtime work is same as regular work, than it is regular work, not overtime!

Hope this helps!

Posted in Microsoft Project 2013, MS PROJECT 2010, MS PROJECT 2016, PMI, PRoject Management | Tagged , , | Leave a comment